Thursday, September 3, 2015

Mr. Robot: Cyberpunk Triumph

Well, my number-one television guilty pleasure this summer was "Mr. Robot" on the USA Network - though it was so good, easily the best new show on TV this summer, indeed of the year, maybe even the past year or two, that there's nothing whatsoever to feel guilty about watching it.  It was just a pleasure, rare, keenly intelligent, and provocative.  I saw most of it in the past few weeks, and the finale tonight.

Hackers have appeared in all kinds of TV series, most of them obvious, a few like CBS's CSI-Cyber not half-bad, but Mr. Robot is something else, in a class all its own.  Impossibly suave and gritty at the same time, as lyrical as Rectify - the other out-of-left-field masterpiece to come along in the past few years - but hipper, with words like louche in  it, and with a heart and soul and slap-in-your face realism and cynicism that's not to be believed, but is plausible all the same, you disbelieve Mr. Robot at your peril.

Cyberpunk has attained impressive heights in writing - Sterling, Gibson, Varley - but not so much on the screen.   Mr. Robot takes its place right up there with its story - its only competition screenwise being Bladerunner, an utterly different kind of tale.

There are elements not only of Occupy Wall Street and V for Vendetta but Fight Club in Mr. Robot, but I won't say which ones or what, because I don't want to spoil your surprise and fun if you haven't yet seen it.  But unlike Fight Club and its progeny, in which the narrative is completely situated in the minds of the characters, in Mr. Robot we have a ratification or support of this in the very digital age we in fact inhabit, in which the difference between the fantasies on screens and realities in first-hand tangible experiences in hand have never been less.

Like many series, the next-to-last episode, and the one before that, packed more of a punch than the finale.  But that doesn't matter, because the story is continuing, the series will be back next year, which makes tonight's finale not a finale at all, but a bridge, and a short one at that.

I'll be here next year with more.

#SFWApro



Wednesday, September 2, 2015

The Eye in the Sky in the Hand: How Video Cameras in Smartphones are Finally Beginning to Bring Police to Justice

I'll be presenting this paper at a Digital Culture Symposium at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia on December 3, 2015, and thought I'd share this abstract with you for starters.  (I'll provide links to the video, is there is one, and details on where to get the entire paper, after the symposium.)

The Eye in the Sky in the Hand: How Video Cameras in Smartphones are Finally Beginning to Bring Police to Justice

by Paul Levinson

Abstract

For the first time in human history, the ubiquity of video cameras in smartphones has made police misconduct publicly accessible to the world at large, including on the Internet, television screens, and in courts of law. This paper will explore the modern history of this revolutionary development, beginning with the 1991 police beating and bystander videotaping of Rodney King, through the role of video cameras in the hands of citizen journalists in Occupy Wall Street, and major cases of police killing unarmed civilians in 2014 and 2015. The uneven impact of this on the judicial system - including not-guilty verdicts and charges not filed by prosecutors - will be explored, as well as the ethics and logistics of police body cams and their impact on police work and democracy, and the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. It’s reasonably clear that police cannot just continue doing business as usual in this new panoptical environment in everyone’s hands. The question is what role will the police play, how will they be expected to perform and held to account, when this new world becomes universally recognized.





Monday, August 31, 2015

Fear the Walking Dead 1.2: Tobias Leads the Way

Fear the Walking Dead continued its powerful start tonight, with a second episode which was relentlessly strong, pounding, and frightening.   As in The Walking Dead, humans have as much to fear from other humans as from zombies, except at this stage the humans include police, a situation all too familiar and chilling to anyone who watches the non-fictitious news.   The cops kill a homeless man.  He's laying there, dead.  Will he soon stagger to his feet?  Your guess is as good as mine.

Meanwhile, you just knew Art would be a zombie, because, well, he looked like a zombie already, last week, when he was still human.  And he faked us out nicely then, when it turned out he wasn't yet a zombie, but was just hunched over, engrossed in some audio.   So seeing him attain his destiny tonight was chillingly satisfying.

I didn't mention Tobias in my review of episode 1, but I was impressed with him then.  He's the only person we've met and seen so far who knows something of what is really going on, and he carries that burden well.  Tonight, he's only happy because he got back his knife, and I'm hoping he accepts Madison's offer to come live (and no doubt run) with them.  Yeah, there's no way that won't happen.

Nick (played by Frank Dillane, son of Stephen Dillane of Game of Thrones and other notable fame, by the way), put in another fine outing, capped off by apparently pretending to be worse than he really was in his drug withdrawal, as a way of getting his sister Alicia to stay with him.  (I say "apparently," because, although he tells his mother he got his sister to stay, you can never be 100% sure.)  Good job Alycia Debnam-Carey playing Alicia, by the way.

Just about every character we've met at any length is appealing, which raises of the question of who will be the first to go among the beloved or at least appealing characters?  It would be something of a coup if the answer was none of these, for at least a while, but this is still The Walking Dead universe we're dealing with, so that's not very likely.

And I'll be back here next week - or, actually, two weeks from tonight, because next week's Labor Day - with a review of the next episode.

(I find most holidays, by the way, to be annoyances.  Here I am making this very point on a HuffPost Live panel earlier this week.)

See also Fear the Walking Dead 1.1: Great Beginnings

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Falling Skies Concludes

Well, although everything up to the ending in this, the very last episode of Falling Skies, was more of the recent same - which is to say, not very interesting or original - the series managed to pull off a memorable conclusion in its last few minutes.

Memorable because, against all odds, there was real change and optimism in that last scene.  Tom giving a speech, maybe prelude to his becoming President, Weaver cleaned up, and everyone looking a little older and very good.  And Tom's last words, that we learned that we're not alone, were just right for the conclusion of this difficult series.

Difficult because, well, how many times, how many ways, can you tell the story of we humans somehow surviving against overwhelming, all but impossible odds?   And our success, based on the premise that if you can destroy the queen, you can wipe out the whole civilization, is not only cliche but was introduced out of the blue just a few episodes ago.

Still, Noah Wylie's acting, and his character Tom Mason and his three boys, and throw in Will Patton's Weaver, especially in this and the previous season, have made an indelible contribution to the science fictional genre of invasions from outer space.   It comes down from Wells' War of the Worlds, through Heinlein's The Puppet Masters and Clarke's Childhood's End  and Damon Knight's "To Serve Man," which was also a great Twilight Zone episode - all of which were much better stories than Falling Skies. But Falling Skies, because of somehow the realness, the uniqueness, of the Mason family, or the impact of this overwhelming invasion on this family, and its stubborn carrying of hope when everything was against them, deserves to be counted among those incredible narratives.

Perhaps we'll discover alien beings out there in the universe tomorrow - or, if our luck turns really bad, be attacked by them.  But till then, Falling Skies will be a fiction worth watching and recalling, with all of its flaws.

See also Falling Skies 5.1: Still Worthy of Viewing ... Falling Skies 5.2: Hybrid ... Falling Skies 5.7: Back Up There ... Falling Skies 5.9: Plummeting

And see also Falling Skies 4.1: Weak Start ... Falling Skies 4.2: Enemy of my Enemy ... Falling Skies 4.3: Still Falling ... Falling Skies 4.5: Cloudy ...Falling Skies 4.7: Massacre Indeed ... Falling Skies 4.8: Spike ... Falling Skies Espheni: How to Pronounce? ... Falling Skies 4.9: To the Moon, Anne, To the Moon ... Falling Skies 4.10: Lexi ... Falling Skies Season 4 Finale: Self-Sacrifice and Redemption

And see also Falling Skies 3.1-2: It's the Acting ... Falling Skies 3.3: The Smile ... Falling Skies 3.4: Hal vs. Ben ... Falling Skies 3.6: The Masons ...Falling Skies 3.7: The Mole and a Likely Answer ... Falling Skies 3.8: Back Cracked Home ... Falling Skies Season 3 Finale: Dust in Hand

And see also Falling Skies Returns  ... Falling Skies 2.6: Ben's Motives ... Falling Skies Second Season Finale

And see also Falling Skies 1.1-2 ... Falling Skies 1.3 meets Puppet Masters ... Falling Skies 1.4: Drizzle ... Falling Skies 1.5: Ben ... Falling Skies 1.6: Fifth Column ... Falling Skies 1.7: The Fate of Traitors ... Falling Skies 1.8: Weaver's Story ... Falling Skies Concludes First Season

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no aliens, but definitely insects

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Falling Skies 5.9: Plummeting

Falling Skies seems to be plummeting to its ultimate conclusion, or lurching along, checking off boxes that need to be checked, rolling out another trite gambit, in episode 5.9 on Sunday night.

Pope is now (presumably) dead.  Check.  Lexi's dead, too, after she comes back, or rather the bad alien comes back in her form, just as happened with Weaver's old flame last week.  Check.

And the new threat?  The Esphemi have not only overloads,  but a queen who is above them, calling the shots - "the"queen" - and she's apparently calling for an ultimate showdown at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.

If time travel were part of this story, maybe Nixon could appear at this showdown, plucked forth from his infamous appearance at the Lincoln Memorial during the protests against his conduct of the Vietnam War.  That would at least be interesting.

What happened to this series?  It had its moments over the years, especially in the early seasons, and even seemed to come back a few episodes ago.  But since then, it's been one trite retread after another.

Somehow, the characters are still pretty interesting, especially Tom and his boys, and Weaver, too. They transcend the tired story lines.

So I'll be watching the series finale next week, if only to see what happens with these characters. And, who knows, maybe Pope survived after all.

See also Falling Skies 5.1: Still Worthy of Viewing ... Falling Skies 5.2: Hybrid ... Falling Skies 5.7: Back Up There

And see also Falling Skies 4.1: Weak Start ... Falling Skies 4.2: Enemy of my Enemy ... Falling Skies 4.3: Still Falling ... Falling Skies 4.5: Cloudy ...Falling Skies 4.7: Massacre Indeed ... Falling Skies 4.8: Spike ... Falling Skies Espheni: How to Pronounce? ... Falling Skies 4.9: To the Moon, Anne, To the Moon ... Falling Skies 4.10: Lexi ... Falling Skies Season 4 Finale: Self-Sacrifice and Redemption

And see also Falling Skies 3.1-2: It's the Acting ... Falling Skies 3.3: The Smile ... Falling Skies 3.4: Hal vs. Ben ... Falling Skies 3.6: The Masons ...Falling Skies 3.7: The Mole and a Likely Answer ... Falling Skies 3.8: Back Cracked Home ... Falling Skies Season 3 Finale: Dust in Hand

And see also Falling Skies Returns  ... Falling Skies 2.6: Ben's Motives ... Falling Skies Second Season Finale

And see also Falling Skies 1.1-2 ... Falling Skies 1.3 meets Puppet Masters ... Falling Skies 1.4: Drizzle ... Falling Skies 1.5: Ben ... Falling Skies 1.6: Fifth Column ... Falling Skies 1.7: The Fate of Traitors ... Falling Skies 1.8: Weaver's Story ... Falling Skies Concludes First Season

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no aliens, but definitely insects

Monday, August 24, 2015

Fear the Walking Dead 1.1: Great Beginnings

Fear the Walking Dead, the prequel to The Walking Dead, debuted on AMC last night, and I gotta say, blasphemous as it may be, that I liked it better than many an episode of The Walking Dead in recent years.

The opener of Fear the Walking Dead was a perfect little masterpiece in itself - beginning like an episode of The Walking Dead, then pulling out to reveal that this world of Los Angeles was still teeming with human beings, and thus a big, significant step before the world of The Walking Dead.

And the episode continues in that fine, frightening vein - beyond frightening, because we the audience of course know all too well what's going on, and what Nick experienced is all too real.  But no one, including Nick, quite knows that yet, and the arc of this first episode bends slowly towards Nick proving to himself and his mother and her man that what he saw in that drug den - his girl friend turned into a flesh eating zombie - was exactly what truly had happened.

And this is beginning to happen all over Los Angeles and in at least five states.  The police can't control zombies who get up and come back at them after being riddled by bullets.   Hospitals can't treat an illness which leaves the deceased all to read to actively spread the disease further and further. We've seen the ultimate result of this in The Walking Dead, and that knowledge makes this prequel even more blood curdling.

Indeed, what we know invests every encounter with the potential for unimaginable danger - or, peril that we can indeed not only imagine but have seen on The Walking Dead.  A school administrator is hunched over his desk, non-responsive.  Has he already turned?  No, in this case he's just listening to some audio.   But it may happen next time we see him, and may have already happened to some poor soul who walked by one of our central characters in the hall.

And the ending leaves provocative questions, too.  Were Nick's mother Madison and Travis bitten in their encounter with the newly-minted zombie?  In The Walking Dead, our characters know to look for that.  In Fear the Walking Dead, no one yet knows what to look for, which means anything can happen.

One of the big reasons I'll be watching next week.

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Ray Donovan 3.7: Excommunication!

One of the best episodes of Ray Donovan this season last night - 3.7 - in which Ray (and probably Terry and Bunchy) are excommunicated by that priest on the case.

Well, it's not exactly the Middle Ages or even the Renaissance, so Ray's not too upset, and even relieved that Fr. Romero wants only to forgive Ray, if Ray confesses, and not go to the cops, if Romero is to be believed.   But Terry's plenty upset about the excommunication, which Romero pronounces after Ray delivers a beat-down not a confession in response to Romero's prodding and pleading, and it will be interesting to see where Ray and Romero go from here.   Will the priest eventually go to the police or be true to his word?  (I was certainly concerned that Romero might have been recording Ray's confession, with an intention of bringing this to the authorities, last night.)  And will Ray just let this play out, or do something more decisive to protect himself and his family?

Meanwhile, Bunch, whose babbling brought Ray to this place in the first place, otherwise had a banner night last night, leaping to Mickey and Daryll's urgently needed defense,  swinging that pipe like "a lion," in Mickey's apt words.   Mickey, typically, bit off more than he could chew, but his heart was in the right place, and his agreeing to bring Bunchy along because another hand was always welcome proved prescient indeed.

The story with Bridget and her teacher (an emigre from Mad Men) is also proceeding nicely, and we're likely to see the two in bed together before too long.   Abby's advice to Bridget that she should go for it will likely be increasingly taken, and the irony's sweet indeed that the "it' is Bridget's teacher, which of course Abby doesn't know.

One last point: it's nice also to see Ray's team slowly coming back together.  Good to see Lena on the job, and the coming attractions show Avi coming back into the orb, too.   One of the hallmarks of Ray Donovan is that, no matter how bad things get in the outside world, if Ray's extended family is together, he has more than a fighting chance.

See also Ray Donovan 3.1: New, Cloudy Ray ... Ray Donovan 3.2: Beat-downs

And see also Ray Donovan 2.1: Back in Business ... Ray Donovan 2.4: The Bad Guy ... Ray Donovan 2.5: Wool Over Eyes ... Ray Donovan 2.7: The Party from Hell ... Ray Donovan 2.10: Scorching ... Ray Donovan 2.11: Out of Control ... Ray Donovan Season 2 Finale: Most Happy Ending

And see also Ray Donovan Debuts with Originality and Flair ... Ray Donovan 1.2: His Assistants and his Family ... Ray Donovan 1.3: Mickey ... Ray Donovan 1.7 and Whitey Bulger ... Ray Donovan 1.8: Poetry and Death ... Ray Donovan Season 1 Finale: The Beginning of Redemption


  different kinds of crimes and fixes

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Masters of Sex 3.7: Going Ape

An hilarious Masters of Sex 3.7 last night - an outrightly laughing out loud episode in many parts - in which Virginia must use not only her savvy as a psychologist of sex but her feminine charms, literally, to motivate Gil the gorilla to do his thing at the zoo.

Simon & Garfunkel sang it's all happening "At the Zoo," but it wasn't happening for Gil, who sadly, just couldn't make it, and Masters and Johnson are tasked to find out why, and put in a cure, if possible.   The key, it turns out, is a woman who used to work at the zoo, and talked endearingly to Gil as prelude to his foreplay.   But the talk wasn't the thing - it was her copious bosom that ignited Gil, and Virginia needs to bare hers to get Gil right again.

That's about where the humor ends.   Virginia's not pleased about what she had to do, Bill is not very sympathetic, but that perfume guy is, and the result is she's drawn closer to him, and with the result that now much more than a bosom is shared, and with increasing frequency.

There was also was an anachronism is this story line - a rare kind of mistake for Masters of Sex - which occurs when Virginia observes that gorillas are  almost "99%" like humans.   That's based on genomic analysis - the Human Genome Project, in particular - which didn't take place until 1990-2003, and in fact the human-great ape comparison wasn't revealed until the end of the project.   True, DNA itself was discovered back in the 1950s, but no one in the 1960s knew the degree of similarity between ape and human genomes.

Hey, it's tough to get things right, and the main reason I know about this is the research I did for my first novel, The Silk Code.   And the error didn't really hurt the story.

What does hurt - not the story, but Bill, and is a powerful marker for potential damage - is when his son partially burns one of Bill's prized football cards.  I almost don't want to see Bill's rage when he discovers that, but of course will be watching the excellent series with rapt attention.

See also Thomas Maier: Masters of Sex and Biography Come to Life ...Masters of Sex 3.1: Galley Slaves ... Masters of Sex 3.2: The Shah, the Baby, and the Book ... Masters of Sex 3.3: The Bookstore

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Falling Skies 5.7: Back Up There

Falling Skies has put up some of its best episodes recently, as the series moves towards its ultimate conclusion in three episodes.

My favorite was 5.6, last week, in which Tom gets treated to something akin to what life was a like before the invasion, with a son coming of age who doesn't (yet) know about the aliens, and a grateful kiss on the lips from the boy's mother.  It all had a bit of a Herschel's farm from The Walking Dead feel - though there was no evil lurking in a barn in this good place - and there are only so many gambits available in a post-apocalyptic narrative.   But this was handled well, and was, against most odds, rather satisfying.

And real, life-changing developments are occurring with our major characters, as befits an ending of a series.  Pope breaking bad was a good touch, and my only regret is that Tom didn't kill him in that quick encounter.  Maggie getting her spikes removed was welcome, and points to at least one path to a happier future.   Ben getting one of his spikes removed, against his will, was not so welcome, and his fate with one or more spikes removed is an interesting, open question.

The human military base pivoting from a safe haven to an instrument of torture and death is something we've seen before, including on Falling Skies.  But the relationship between the commander and Weaver is a nice touch, and it will be fun to see how that plays out.

Falling Skies has regained some of its luster, and has a chance to really end on a memorable note in the episodes ahead.   I'm looking forward to them.

See also Falling Skies 5.1: Still Worthy of Viewing ... Falling Skies 5.2: Hybrid

And see also Falling Skies 4.1: Weak Start ... Falling Skies 4.2: Enemy of my Enemy ... Falling Skies 4.3: Still Falling ... Falling Skies 4.5: Cloudy ...Falling Skies 4.7: Massacre Indeed ... Falling Skies 4.8: Spike ... Falling Skies Espheni: How to Pronounce? ... Falling Skies 4.9: To the Moon, Anne, To the Moon ... Falling Skies 4.10: Lexi ... Falling Skies Season 4 Finale: Self-Sacrifice and Redemption

And see also Falling Skies 3.1-2: It's the Acting ... Falling Skies 3.3: The Smile ... Falling Skies 3.4: Hal vs. Ben ... Falling Skies 3.6: The Masons ...Falling Skies 3.7: The Mole and a Likely Answer ... Falling Skies 3.8: Back Cracked Home ... Falling Skies Season 3 Finale: Dust in Hand

And see also Falling Skies Returns  ... Falling Skies 2.6: Ben's Motives ... Falling Skies Second Season Finale

And see also Falling Skies 1.1-2 ... Falling Skies 1.3 meets Puppet Masters ... Falling Skies 1.4: Drizzle ... Falling Skies 1.5: Ben ... Falling Skies 1.6: Fifth Column ... Falling Skies 1.7: The Fate of Traitors ... Falling Skies 1.8: Weaver's Story ... Falling Skies Concludes First Season

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no aliens, but definitely insects

Monday, August 10, 2015

Deutschland 83 Season 1 Finale: Looking Forward to More

A good finale to what I hope will just be the first of many seasons of Deutschland 83, but, as often happens in television drama, not quite as effective as the immediately preceding episodes.

The highpoint of those episodes was Martin/Stamm telling General Edel that he (Stamm) was really an East German agent - Martin needing to do this as the only way he could think of to get Edel to call off the exercise which the Soviets and some East Germans were sure was a build-up to a real attack.

In the finale, the only big surprise was Edel taking his life at the end - which I was sorry to see, not because the character was so sympathetic (he was a rotten father, for sure), but because he added a lot to the story.  The other reveal, that Walter (be my guest and spell his last name yourself) was Martin's father, was not quite as big of a shocker, but has all kinds of potential for further seasons.

The extent of the AIDS infection is also of interest. Tischbier may or may not have it, which means the same for Edel's son.   Truthfully, I wouldn't mind seeing both gone in subsequent seasons, since each, in his own way, was annoying in this first season.

Not so Annett, who, other than Martin, was one of the most interesting and compelling characters this year.  It's still hard for me to wrap my head around how she could be so loyal to the East Germans, but that's one of the main points of this story, isn't it?  Attractive and otherwise decent people can be loyal to a totalitarian society that locks you up for reading 1984.

But speaking of East German officials, I also found the guy who doubted that the West was attacking, and stood up both to Walter and the Soviets, of some interest.  Would be good to see more of him next season, too.

So, yeah, I hope there is a Deutschland 83 season 2 - which hasn't been announced yet - and which I'll be eagerly watching for and reviewing, in case this makes any difference to those who call those renewal shots.

See also Deutschland 83: Edge of Your Seat and Memorable Espionage ... Deutschland 83 106: Grave Developments


 

different kind of spies

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True Detective Season 2 Finale: Good Smoke but No Cigar

Well, I've apparently enjoyed True Detective season 2 more than have most of the people who have publicly been posting about it, but I gotta say that the season finale, though certainly powerful and even justified, was a little too grim for my ever-hopeful taste.

Ray dying and the reason he did was also a little trite.  He could have made it, gotten away with Ani and the money, except, against all reasonable caution, he needs to see his son one last time.  You just knew that that would be his undoing, and you have to wonder why Ray didn't realize it, too.   And even then, why not let him escape in this woods, and maybe kill Buris in the act, too?

Frank's death was also predictable, given the commitment that he made to meet Jordan in two weeks "or less".   The twist of who did him in was strong, though - as was the way he want out, walking, mortally wounded, in the desert.   That was certainly a fitting way to go.

Ani and Ray were good couple, and their all-too-brief relationship was handled well.  Especially memorable was Ray's telling Ani that this was the first time for him in a long time, Ani saying she could see that, Ray asking how, and Ani saying he seemed like a man who was "making up for lost time".   That scene was one of the best of season, capped off by Ray's smile in the car, when he can't quite bring himself to tell Ani he loves her, though she knows that's the way he feels and she the same.

Ani and Kelly's survival, with Ani and Ray's baby, was also a nice way to end this story.   All in all, enjoyable television, but not even close to the masterpiece that this series was in its first season.

See also Season Two: True Detective: All New ... True Detective 2.2: Pulling a Game of Thrones ... True Detective 2.3: Buckshot and Twitty ...True Detective 2.4: Shoot-out ... True Detective 2.7: Death and the Anti-Hero

And see also Season One: True Detective: Socrates in Louisiana ... True Detective Season One Finale: Light above Darkness

 
Like philosophic crime fiction?   Try The Plot to Save Socrates ...

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Humans 1.7: "I Think You're Dead, George"

The past two episodes of Humans - 1.6 and 1.7 - have been really outstanding, with deaths, near deaths, and all kinds of change-ups which really transform the narrative, excellent to begin with.

Mia coming out is the key to most of this.   As a sentient synth rather than a servo-mechanism, she's everything we could want: protective not only of her android family, but the human family where she worked and lived as Anita.   The end of 1.7 is especially significant in showing the depths of her feelings about the Hawkins: when they ask her and the synths to leave, after seeing a report of Niska's earlier rampage, Mia agrees, even though the synchs will be far more vulnerable out there, amidst those English (this is my reference to the movie, Witness, in case you missed it).   And just for good measure, we get Mia telling Joe that she was "there" the whole time when he had sex with Anita, and we don't get even a hint from Mia about whether that was good, bad, or neutral for Mia (though Mia certainly doesn't seem angry with Joe).

Meanwhile, Max is handled beautifully and hauntingly.  In 1.6, he sacrifices his own life - or puts it at severe risk - to save Leo, and his partial revival in 1.7 is a sight to see.   Losing his identity - hell, let's call it soul - as his damaged code disintegrates, he still smiles on the table, the smile of the Cheshire Cat, though Max's smile is nothing but genuinely benevolent.   Keeping him sentient also now provides an immediate reason for the sentient synths to put together and implement that secret code within them as a group - a motive far more pressing than creating a potential species of thousands of sentient androids around the world.

George Millican, being only human, is apparently beyond recovery.  In one of the most chilling lines in the story, the damaged Odi, talking to Millican as he breathes his last, remarks, "I think you're dead, George," in that deadpan mechanical voice of his.

Looking forward to the season finale, and how the now murderous Karen will figure into it.

George may be dead, but Humans is teeming with life and profoundly intriguing questions.

See also Humans: In Ascending Order


a different kind of humans

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